Urantia Book Forum

Urantia Book Discussion Board : Study Group
It is currently Sat Nov 26, 2022 4:30 pm +0000

All times are UTC - 7 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 912 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 57, 58, 59, 60, 61
Author Message
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:29 am +0000
Posts: 5566
You may know about Joseph Campbell's work decades ago about the same subject of the common and shared human myths from isolated and disparate cultures separated by great distances and epochs.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell)


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
Bradley - nice yes I watched it all yesterday - great stuff and Hancock has some great points - he does say we should be open to looking at some myths as true stories - did not read Campbell tho -
but I have been following Hancock on his youtubes and stuff - but the Younger Dryas deal - pretty much confirmed I think that the meteor shower hit - you will see in episodes 6-7-8 - they found the black mat in the earth confirming the meteor showers- 1000 years of soil turned black from it in hillside soil samples - maybe 12-14 days that the Taurid shower hit the earth - was north america-mexico into the top of south america and all the way over to Syria - so it maybe didn't hit all continents - BUT the meteor shower blew up the northern ice sheet/wall and caused the flooding 300-400 ft of ocean sea level rise 10,800 bc to 9600bc (12,800 to 11,600 years ago) when things clamed down -and the washington state Badlands - maybe huge water cutting thru the area from the northern Ice sheet melting quick - 2 weeks not thousands of years - Randell Carlson is on - and he is great also - have watched his you tubes on geology as well

and the northern ice sheet/wall may have been really tall - ala game of thrones ice wall type of thing - huge -
and Gobekli Tepi is confirmed at 9600 bc - and you will be amazed at column 43 at Gobekli Tepe

anyway - GH isn't a scientist or archeologist - but just a very intuitive reporter and believes main stream archeology is not tellng the truth about ancient history...or just not wanting to look at the truth - like even the soil erosion around the Sphnix at Giza - would place it at least back to 10,800 bc - also noted was a water mark halfway up the Great pyramid from the flood time as well - watermark is gone now tho

and you will like the bit about turkey - 240kms north of Gobekli Tepi site withthe underground craved out soft rock citys - huge - and many were done

anyway - I think this is the UB part that skipped from 12,000 to 9000 to 5000 bc with no talk of the flood or whatever - got me thinking as to why the flood story was skipped over
but yes - great show - right up my alley for history and lost history from GH on netflix - whoa ! am a big fan of GH and Randall Carlson as well



3. Cities, Manufacture, and Commerce
81:3.1 (903.3) The climatic destruction of the rich, open grassland hunting and grazing grounds of Turkestan, beginning about 12,000 b.c., compelled the men of those regions to resort to new forms of industry and crude manufacturing. Some turned to the cultivation of domesticated flocks, others became agriculturists or collectors of water-borne food, but the higher type of Andite intellects chose to engage in trade and manufacture. It even became the custom for entire tribes to dedicate themselves to the development of a single industry. From the valley of the Nile to the Hindu Kush and from the Ganges to the Yellow River, the chief business of the superior tribes became the cultivation of the soil, with commerce as a side line.

81:3.2 (903.4) The increase in trade and in the manufacture of raw materials into various articles of commerce was directly instrumental in producing those early and semipeaceful communities which were so influential in spreading the culture and the arts of civilization. Before the era of extensive world trade, social communities were tribal—expanded family groups. Trade brought into fellowship different sorts of human beings, thus contributing to a more speedy cross-fertilization of culture.

81:3.3 (903.5) About twelve thousand years ago the era of the independent cities was dawning. And these primitive trading and manufacturing cities were always surrounded by zones of agriculture and cattle raising. While it is true that industry was promoted by the elevation of the standards of living, you should have no misconception regarding the refinements of early urban life. The early races were not overly neat and clean, and the average primitive community rose from one to two feet every twenty-five years as the result of the mere accumulation of dirt and trash. Certain of these olden cities also rose above the surrounding ground very quickly because their unbaked mud huts were short-lived, and it was the custom to build new dwellings directly on top of the ruins of the old.

81:3.4 (903.6) The widespread use of metals was a feature of this era of the early industrial and trading cities. You have already found a bronze culture in Turkestan dating before 9000 b.c., and the Andites early learned to work in iron, gold, and copper, as well. But conditions were very different away from the more advanced centers of civilization. There were no distinct periods, such as the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages; all three existed at the same time in different localities.

81:3.5 (904.1) Gold was the first metal to be sought by man; it was easy to work and, at first, was used only as an ornament. Copper was next employed but not extensively until it was admixed with tin to make the harder bronze. The discovery of mixing copper and tin to make bronze was made by one of the Adamsonites of Turkestan whose highland copper mine happened to be located alongside a tin deposit.

81:3.6 (904.2) With the appearance of crude manufacture and beginning industry, commerce quickly became the most potent influence in the spread of cultural civilization. The opening up of the trade channels by land and by sea greatly facilitated travel and the mixing of cultures as well as the blending of civilizations. By 5000 b.c. the horse was in general use throughout civilized and semicivilized lands. These later races not only had the domesticated horse but also various sorts of wagons and chariots. Ages before, the wheel had been used, but now vehicles so equipped became universally employed both in commerce and war.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
Bradley - am downloading it now - looks pretty good

Joeseph Campbell - the Power of Myth documentary from 1988 - can still be downloaded

https://thepiratebay.org/description.php?id=7479965


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
GH - Ancient Apocalypse - episode 6 - Poverty point in LA and the Serpent mound in Ohio - amazing history and sun alignment summer and winter solstices - by native americans? how they aligned up the mounds ? - will not spoil the show tho - have to watch it yourself 5 5 5

do not want to giveaway any hints - but GH has done his homework
and the old maps section - Bimini road and the bigger island preflood on Pieri Riess map and Antartica - joind to South america by ice on the 1513 map... hmmm... how long ago were those maps originally copied from - yikes !


Last edited by shrimpythai on Sun Nov 13, 2022 1:51 am +0000, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
OK BACK TO THE PAPERS ! but the Graham Hancock seris is great 5 5 5

Paper 87
The Ghost Cults
87:0.1 (958.1) THE ghost cult evolved as an offset to the hazards of bad luck; its primitive religious observances were the outgrowth of anxiety about bad luck and of the inordinate fear of the dead. None of these early religions had much to do with the recognition of Deity or with reverence for the superhuman; their rites were mostly negative, designed to avoid, expel, or coerce ghosts. The ghost cult was nothing more nor less than insurance against disaster; it had nothing to do with investment for higher and future returns.

87:0.2 (958.2) Man has had a long and bitter struggle with the ghost cult. Nothing in human history is designed to excite more pity than this picture of man’s abject slavery to ghost-spirit fear. With the birth of this very fear mankind started on the upgrade of religious evolution. Human imagination cast off from the shores of self and will not again find anchor until it arrives at the concept of a true Deity, a real God.

1. Ghost Fear
87:1.1 (958.3) Death was feared because death meant the liberation of another ghost from its physical body. The ancients did their best to prevent death, to avoid the trouble of having to contend with a new ghost. They were always anxious to induce the ghost to leave the scene of death, to embark on the journey to deadland. The ghost was feared most of all during the supposed transition period between its emergence at the time of death and its later departure for the ghost homeland, a vague and primitive concept of pseudo heaven.

87:1.2 (958.4) Though the savage credited ghosts with supernatural powers, he hardly conceived of them as having supernatural intelligence. Many tricks and stratagems were practiced in an effort to hoodwink and deceive the ghosts; civilized man still pins much faith on the hope that an outward manifestation of piety will in some manner deceive even an omniscient Deity.

87:1.3 (958.5) The primitives feared sickness because they observed it was often a harbinger of death. If the tribal medicine man failed to cure an afflicted individual, the sick man was usually removed from the family hut, being taken to a smaller one or left in the open air to die alone. A house in which death had occurred was usually destroyed; if not, it was always avoided, and this fear prevented early man from building substantial dwellings. It also militated against the establishment of permanent villages and cities.

87:1.4 (958.6) The savages sat up all night and talked when a member of the clan died; they feared they too would die if they fell asleep in the vicinity of a corpse. Contagion from the corpse substantiated the fear of the dead, and all peoples, at one time or another, have employed elaborate purification ceremonies designed to cleanse an individual after contact with the dead. The ancients believed that light must be provided for a corpse; a dead body was never permitted to remain in the dark. In the twentieth century, candles are still burned in death chambers, and men still sit up with the dead. So-called civilized man has hardly yet completely eliminated the fear of dead bodies from his philosophy of life.

87:1.5 (959.1) But despite all this fear, men still sought to trick the ghost. If the death hut was not destroyed, the corpse was removed through a hole in the wall, never by way of the door. These measures were taken to confuse the ghost, to prevent its tarrying, and to insure against its return. Mourners also returned from a funeral by a different road, lest the ghost follow. Backtracking and scores of other tactics were practiced to insure that the ghost would not return from the grave. The sexes often exchanged clothes in order to deceive the ghost. Mourning costumes were designed to disguise survivors; later on, to show respect for the dead and thus appease the ghosts.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
yep more on Ghosts - I still think that we have a 3 day after time frame for the soul to depart - not sure what the UB says - just the Jesus 3 days in the tomb...form death to resurection...then 30 days after he resuructed...hmmm - not sure how long the soul stays around - but 3 days seems to be the deal???

2. Ghost Placation
87:2.1 (959.2) In religion the negative program of ghost placation long preceded the positive program of spirit coercion and supplication. The first acts of human worship were phenomena of defense, not reverence. Modern man deems it wise to insure against fire; so the savage thought it the better part of wisdom to provide insurance against ghost bad luck. The effort to secure this protection constituted the techniques and rituals of the ghost cult.

87:2.2 (959.3) It was once thought that the great desire of a ghost was to be quickly “laid” so that it might proceed undisturbed to deadland. Any error of commission or omission in the acts of the living in the ritual of laying the ghost was sure to delay its progress to ghostland. This was believed to be displeasing to the ghost, and an angered ghost was supposed to be a source of calamity, misfortune, and unhappiness.

87:2.3 (959.4) The funeral service originated in man’s effort to induce the ghost soul to depart for its future home, and the funeral sermon was originally designed to instruct the new ghost how to get there. It was the custom to provide food and clothes for the ghost’s journey, these articles being placed in or near the grave. The savage believed that it required from three days to a year to “lay the ghost”—to get it away from the vicinity of the grave. The Eskimos still believe that the soul stays with the body three days.

87:2.4 (959.5) Silence or mourning was observed after a death so that the ghost would not be attracted back home. Self-torture—wounds—was a common form of mourning. Many advanced teachers tried to stop this, but they failed. Fasting and other forms of self-denial were thought to be pleasing to the ghosts, who took pleasure in the discomfort of the living during the transition period of lurking about before their actual departure for deadland.

87:2.5 (959.6) Long and frequent periods of mourning inactivity were one of the great obstacles to civilization’s advancement. Weeks and even months of each year were literally wasted in this nonproductive and useless mourning. The fact that professional mourners were hired for funeral occasions indicates that mourning was a ritual, not an evidence of sorrow. Moderns may mourn the dead out of respect and because of bereavement, but the ancients did this because of fear.

87:2.6 (959.7) The names of the dead were never spoken. In fact, they were often banished from the language. These names became taboo, and in this way the languages were constantly impoverished. This eventually produced a multiplication of symbolic speech and figurative expression, such as “the name or day one never mentions.”

87:2.7 (960.1) The ancients were so anxious to get rid of a ghost that they offered it everything which might have been desired during life. Ghosts wanted wives and servants; a well-to-do savage expected that at least one slave wife would be buried alive at his death. It later became the custom for a widow to commit suicide on her husband’s grave. When a child died, the mother, aunt, or grandmother was often strangled in order that an adult ghost might accompany and care for the child ghost. And those who thus gave up their lives usually did so willingly; indeed, had they lived in violation of custom, their fear of ghost wrath would have denuded life of such few pleasures as the primitives enjoyed.

87:2.8 (960.2) It was customary to dispatch a large number of subjects to accompany a dead chief; slaves were killed when their master died that they might serve him in ghostland. The Borneans still provide a courier companion; a slave is speared to death to make the ghost journey with his deceased master. Ghosts of murdered persons were believed to be delighted to have the ghosts of their murderers as slaves; this notion motivated men to head hunting.

87:2.9 (960.3) Ghosts supposedly enjoyed the smell of food; food offerings at funeral feasts were once universal. The primitive method of saying grace was, before eating, to throw a bit of food into the fire for the purpose of appeasing the spirits, while mumbling a magic formula.

87:2.10 (960.4) The dead were supposed to use the ghosts of the tools and weapons that were theirs in life. To break an article was to “kill it,” thus releasing its ghost to pass on for service in ghostland. Property sacrifices were also made by burning or burying. Ancient funeral wastes were enormous. Later races made paper models and substituted drawings for real objects and persons in these death sacrifices. It was a great advance in civilization when the inheritance of kin replaced the burning and burying of property. The Iroquois Indians made many reforms in funeral waste. And this conservation of property enabled them to become the most powerful of the northern red men. Modern man is not supposed to fear ghosts, but custom is strong, and much terrestrial wealth is still consumed on funeral rituals and death ceremonies.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
more ghost cult info

3. Ancestor Worship
87:3.1 (960.5) The advancing ghost cult made ancestor worship inevitable since it became the connecting link between common ghosts and the higher spirits, the evolving gods. The early gods were simply glorified departed humans.
ok the early gods might have been human - but Niphilim + human mothers - not so sure they were all "human" - maybe mixed race ... ???

87:3.2 (960.6) Ancestor worship was originally more of a fear than a worship, but such beliefs did definitely contribute to the further spread of ghost fear and worship. Devotees of the early ancestor-ghost cults even feared to yawn lest a malignant ghost enter their bodies at such a time.

87:3.3 (960.7) The custom of adopting children was to make sure that someone would provide offerings after death for the peace and progress of the soul. The savage lived in fear of the ghosts of his fellows and spent his spare time planning for the safe conduct of his own ghost after death.

87:3.4 (960.8) Most tribes instituted an all-souls’ feast at least once a year. The Romans had twelve ghost feasts and accompanying ceremonies each year. Half the days of the year were dedicated to some sort of ceremony associated with these ancient cults. One Roman emperor tried to reform these practices by reducing the number of feast days to 135 a year.
yikes


87:3.5 (961.1) The ghost cult was in continuous evolution. As ghosts were envisioned as passing from the incomplete to the higher phase of existence, so did the cult eventually progress to the worship of spirits, and even gods. But regardless of varying beliefs in more advanced spirits, all tribes and races once believed in ghosts.

4. Good and Bad Spirit Ghosts
87:4.1 (961.2) Ghost fear was the fountainhead of all world religion; and for ages many tribes clung to the old belief in one class of ghosts. They taught that man had good luck when the ghost was pleased, bad luck when he was angered.

87:4.2 (961.3) As the cult of ghost fear expanded, there came about the recognition of higher types of spirits, spirits not definitely identifiable with any individual human. They were graduate or glorified ghosts who had progressed beyond the domain of ghostland to the higher realms of spiritland.

87:4.3 (961.4) The notion of two kinds of spirit ghosts made slow but sure progress throughout the world. This new dual spiritism did not have to spread from tribe to tribe; it sprang up independently all over the world. In influencing the expanding evolutionary mind, the power of an idea lies not in its reality or reasonableness but rather in its vividness and the universality of its ready and simple application.

87:4.4 (961.5) Still later the imagination of man envisioned the concept of both good and bad supernatural agencies; some ghosts never evolved to the level of good spirits. The early monospiritism of ghost fear was gradually evolving into a dual spiritism, a new concept of the invisible control of earthly affairs. At last good luck and bad luck were pictured as having their respective controllers. And of the two classes, the group that brought bad luck were believed to be the more active and numerous.

87:4.5 (961.6) When the doctrine of good and bad spirits finally matured, it became the most widespread and persistent of all religious beliefs. This dualism represented a great religio-philosophic advance because it enabled man to account for both good luck and bad luck while at the same time believing in supermortal beings who were to some extent consistent in their behavior. The spirits could be counted on to be either good or bad; they were not thought of as being completely temperamental as the early ghosts of the monospiritism of most primitive religions had been conceived to be. Man was at last able to conceive of supermortal forces that were consistent in behavior, and this was one of the most momentous discoveries of truth in the entire history of the evolution of religion and in the expansion of human philosophy.

87:4.6 (961.7) Evolutionary religion has, however, paid a terrible price for the concept of dual spiritism. Man’s early philosophy was able to reconcile spirit constancy with the vicissitudes of temporal fortune only by postulating two kinds of spirits, one good and the other bad. And while this belief did enable man to reconcile the variables of chance with a concept of unchanging supermortal forces, this doctrine has ever since made it difficult for religionists to conceive of cosmic unity. The gods of evolutionary religion have generally been opposed by the forces of darkness.

87:4.7 (962.1) The tragedy of all this lies in the fact that, when these ideas were taking root in the primitive mind of man, there really were no bad or disharmonious spirits in all the world. Such an unfortunate situation did not develop until after the Caligastic rebellion and only persisted until Pentecost. The concept of good and evil as cosmic co-ordinates is, even in the twentieth century, very much alive in human philosophy; most of the world’s religions still carry this cultural birthmark of the long-gone days of the emerging ghost cults.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
wow 87:5 is good !

5. The Advancing Ghost Cult
87:5.1 (962.2) Primitive man viewed the spirits and ghosts as having almost unlimited rights but no duties; the spirits were thought to regard man as having manifold duties but no rights. The spirits were believed to look down upon man as constantly failing in the discharge of his spiritual duties. It was the general belief of mankind that ghosts levied a continuous tribute of service as the price of noninterference in human affairs, and the least mischance was laid to ghost activities. Early humans were so afraid they might overlook some honor due the gods that, after they had sacrificed to all known spirits, they did another turn to the “unknown gods,” just to be thoroughly safe.

87:5.2 (962.3) And now the simple ghost cult is followed by the practices of the more advanced and relatively complex spirit-ghost cult, the service and worship of the higher spirits as they evolved in man’s primitive imagination. Religious ceremonial must keep pace with spirit evolution and progress. The expanded cult was but the art of self-maintenance practiced in relation to belief in supernatural beings, self-adjustment to spirit environment. Industrial and military organizations were adjustments to natural and social environments. And as marriage arose to meet the demands of bisexuality, so did religious organization evolve in response to the belief in higher spirit forces and spiritual beings. Religion represents man’s adjustment to his illusions of the mystery of chance. Spirit fear and subsequent worship were adopted as insurance against misfortune, as prosperity policies.

87:5.3 (962.4) The savage visualizes the good spirits as going about their business, requiring little from human beings. It is the bad ghosts and spirits who must be kept in good humor. Accordingly, primitive peoples paid more attention to their malevolent ghosts than to their benign spirits.

87:5.4 (962.5) Human prosperity was supposed to be especially provocative of the envy of evil spirits, and their method of retaliation was to strike back through a human agency and by the technique of the evil eye. That phase of the cult which had to do with spirit avoidance was much concerned with the machinations of the evil eye. The fear of it became almost world-wide. Pretty women were veiled to protect them from the evil eye; subsequently many women who desired to be considered beautiful adopted this practice. Because of this fear of bad spirits, children were seldom allowed out after dark, and the early prayers always included the petition, “deliver us from the evil eye.”
yes the old "evil eye" deal yikes

87:5.5 (962.6) The Koran contains a whole chapter devoted to the evil eye and magic spells, and the Jews fully believed in them. The whole phallic cult grew up as a defense against the evil eye. The organs of reproduction were thought to be the only fetish which could render it powerless. The evil eye gave origin to the first superstitions respecting prenatal marking of children, maternal impressions, and the cult was at one time well-nigh universal.
maybe still is going on today ...hmmm...

87:5.6 (963.1) Envy is a deep-seated human trait; therefore did primitive man ascribe it to his early gods. And since man had once practiced deception upon the ghosts, he soon began to deceive the spirits. Said he, “If the spirits are jealous of our beauty and prosperity, we will disfigure ourselves and speak lightly of our success.” Early humility was not, therefore, debasement of ego but rather an attempt to foil and deceive the envious spirits.

87:5.7 (963.2) The method adopted to prevent the spirits from becoming jealous of human prosperity was to heap vituperation upon some lucky or much loved thing or person. The custom of depreciating complimentary remarks regarding oneself or family had its origin in this way, and it eventually evolved into civilized modesty, restraint, and courtesy. In keeping with the same motive, it became the fashion to look ugly. Beauty aroused the envy of spirits; it betokened sinful human pride. The savage sought for an ugly name. This feature of the cult was a great handicap to the advancement of art, and it long kept the world somber and ugly.

87:5.8 (963.3) Under the spirit cult, life was at best a gamble, the result of spirit control. One’s future was not the result of effort, industry, or talent except as they might be utilized to influence the spirits. The ceremonies of spirit propitiation constituted a heavy burden, rendering life tedious and virtually unendurable. From age to age and from generation to generation, race after race has sought to improve this superghost doctrine, but no generation has ever yet dared to wholly reject it.

87:5.9 (963.4) The intention and will of the spirits were studied by means of omens, oracles, and signs. And these spirit messages were interpreted by divination, soothsaying, magic, ordeals, and astrology. The whole cult was a scheme designed to placate, satisfy, and buy off the spirits through this disguised bribery.

87:5.10 (963.5) And thus there grew up a new and expanded world philosophy consisting in:

87:5.11 (963.6) 1. Duty—those things which must be done to keep the spirits favorably disposed, at least neutral.

87:5.12 (963.7) 2. Right—the correct conduct and ceremonies designed to win the spirits actively to one’s interests.

87:5.13 (963.8) 3. Truth—the correct understanding of, and attitude toward, spirits, and hence toward life and death.

87:5.14 (963.9) It was not merely out of curiosity that the ancients sought to know the future; they wanted to dodge ill luck. Divination was simply an attempt to avoid trouble. During these times, dreams were regarded as prophetic, while everything out of the ordinary was considered an omen. And even today the civilized races are cursed with the belief in signs, tokens, and other superstitious remnants of the advancing ghost cult of old. Slow, very slow, is man to abandon those methods whereby he so gradually and painfully ascended the evolutionary scale of life.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:29 am +0000
Posts: 5566
Indeed so!!

There are even UB readers, at this site (!), who believe that recent certain solar eclipses, at certain dates and locations, portend some celestial or planetary events of great importance.

Good grief. How ridiculously primitive...and sad.

https://forum.truthbook.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6078

Magic numbers, dates, locations, predictions, second comings, apocalypse, divine interventions, astrology....eclipses.

Holy Moly!! :roll:


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:44 am +0000
Posts: 587
Location: thailand
yes I am trying not to believe on all the superstious stuff - magic numbers - astrology etc ....


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:29 am +0000
Posts: 5566
shrimpythai wrote:
yes I am trying not to believe on all the superstious stuff - magic numbers - astrology etc ....


I know, right? Me too! Our world and all its cultures are still saturated with these primitivisms which originate long, long ago. Marriage and funeral ceremonies, baby christenings, evil eyes and curses, good luck and bad. Making deals with the Devil down at the crossroads at midnight. Ladders, black cats, throwing salt, knocking on wood.

The Catholics still perform exorcism of evil spirits and demons which they claim possess bodies and minds. Spells and incantations and magic. So called haunted houses and ghost detection is big business and prime time tv!

The UB lists so many others still practiced today, and informs us we are only now BEGINNING to emerge from primitive barbarity...despite our technology and toys.

One of the surprises for me in the UB is its praise and promotion of reason and science to improve and evolve humanity's progress in religious truth by freeing the mind of fears, superstitions, false causes and effects, and all the primitive falsehoods invented in the tree nests, caves, and huts of humanity's ancient past.

These Papers we study together here are intended to inform and enlightenment so we might be free to grow beyond these chains of superstition that are not real or based on reality at all. Evolutionary progress requires gaining knowledge, experience, and wisdom, all of which also result in abandoning prior falsehoods. Add. And subtract. Both.

We cannot believe our world orbits the sun AND also believe the sun rises and sets. It doesn't. The planet spins on its axis AND orbits Sol, both. Some today still believe the stars at night race across the sky when truly does the world itself spin and spin and spin while hurtling through space in a solar orbit maintained by gravity. We must evolve and gain a universe reality perspective that reflects and represents that reality after all.

Superstitions are invented to explain things we cannot yet explain otherwise (metaphysics withot any physics - :lol: ). Science and revelation combine to reveal the true causes of all reality effects and the true effects of all reality causes.

With an interesting amount of mystery and paradox to keep us interested...and seeking greater understanding.

8)


Last edited by fanofVan on Sun Nov 20, 2022 1:23 pm +0000, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted:  
Offline

Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 5:29 am +0000
Posts: 5566
118:10.12 (1306.1) In the beginnings on an evolutionary world the natural occurrences of the material order and the personal desires of human beings often appear to be antagonistic. Much that takes place on an evolving world is rather hard for mortal man to understand—natural law is so often apparently cruel, heartless, and indifferent to all that is true, beautiful, and good in human comprehension. But as humanity progresses in planetary development, we observe that this viewpoint is modified by the following factors:

118:10.13 (1306.2) 1. Man’s augmenting vision—his increased understanding of the world in which he lives; his enlarging capacity for the comprehension of the material facts of time, the meaningful ideas of thought, and the valuable ideals of spiritual insight. As long as men measure only by the yardstick of the things of a physical nature, they can never hope to find unity in time and space.

118:10.14 (1306.3) 2. Man’s increasing control—the gradual accumulation of the knowledge of the laws of the material world, the purposes of spiritual existence, and the possibilities of the philosophic co-ordination of these two realities. Man, the savage, was helpless before the onslaughts of natural forces, was slavish before the cruel mastery of his own inner fears. Semicivilized man is beginning to unlock the storehouse of the secrets of the natural realms, and his science is slowly but effectively destroying his superstitions while at the same time providing a new and enlarged factual basis for the comprehension of the meanings of philosophy and the values of true spiritual experience. Man, the civilized, will someday achieve relative mastery of the physical forces of his planet; the love of God in his heart will be effectively outpoured as love for his fellow men, while the values of human existence will be nearing the limits of mortal capacity.

118:10.15 (1306.4) 3. Man’s universe integration—the increase of human insight plus the increase of human experiential achievement brings him into closer harmony with the unifying presences of Supremacy—Paradise Trinity and Supreme Being. And this is what establishes the sovereignty of the Supreme on the worlds long settled in light and life. Such advanced planets are indeed poems of harmony, pictures of the beauty of achieved goodness attained through the pursuit of cosmic truth. And if such things can happen to a planet, then even greater things can happen to a system and the larger units of the grand universe as they too achieve a settledness indicating the exhaustion of the potentials for finite growth.

8)

Superstitions - Superstition - Superstitious

https://www.urantia.org/urantia-book/se ... &op=Search

https://www.urantia.org/urantia-book/se ... &op=Search

https://www.urantia.org/urantia-book/se ... &op=Search

8)


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 912 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 57, 58, 59, 60, 61

All times are UTC - 7 hours


Who is online

Registered users: Google Feedfetcher


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You can post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group